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The Cremation Process


Making Diamonds from Ashes

The Most Beautiful Form of Rare Beauty

For more than a century, scientists have been experimenting with creating man-made diamonds in a few months that are of a quality equal to the variety that nature makes in millions of years. This quest has been met with suspicion in the gemstone industry, of course. Jewelers have reason to be concerned that such a discovery would render their precious natural jewels all-but-worthless. But the endeavor has charged on over the decades because an endless stream of diamonds would be a great boon for technology. Diamonds, you see, are the second best conductors of electricity in the world. (Second only to pure vacuum, a condition that is very difficult to create on Earth.) So, an inexpensive source of diamonds would benefit the production of all sorts of electrical gadgets.

So, much to the concern of the world’s jewelers, man-made diamonds are now quite common. While most of the synthetic diamond is used for industrial purposes, allowing natural diamond gems to maintain their value, there is, increasingly, a market for synthetic gemstones (which cost a fraction of natural diamonds and can often fool even the most sophisticated of machines designed to know the difference.) Some jewelry industry observers say it is only a matter of time before synthetic diamonds will be so “natural” that no one will be able to identify a true, natural stone. And, at that point, Karl Marx’s prediction might come true: Even natural diamonds will see “their value fall below that of bricks.”

Fortunately, for those concerned about the value of gemstones, a new idea has come about that will make some synthetic diamonds virtually priceless. Man made diamonds can now be created using cremation ashes.

Diamonds come from ashes using the same carbon-conversion processes used to form other types of synthetic diamonds. In fact, all of the synthetic procedures do, basically, the same thing that the Earth does naturally to create diamonds: they apply a huge amount of pressure to carbon molecules. The difference, of course, is that the Earth applies the pressure over millions of years, and the synthetic procedures require only a few weeks.

The new idea of creating diamonds from cremation remains has caught on across America and is steadily building across the world. While other synthetic diamonds are generally not as expensive as natural diamonds, the diamonds formed by cremation ashes can often cost even more than their natural cousins can. This all-but assures that Marx’s prediction, at least concerning one form of diamond, is probably not entirely accurate.

To create diamonds from cremation ashes, all one has to do is place an order, usually via the mail, telephone or online, with one of the companies that provide the service. The company will typically send the customer a “kit” with instructions for returning a small portion of ashes. The customer then responds with a small amount of the ashes, and a few weeks later, a new diamond arrives from the company.

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